Lesson plans

Introductory Presentation and Notes for Brave New World

 

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This presentation provides all of the details needed for students to understand and appreciate the novel. There are 40 slides that cover author, historical context, related political terminology, settings, point of view, conflict, characters, themes, symbolism, and related videos. Additionally, this unit contains two sets of now (one question/answer form, one cloze note form for differentiation) that follows the presentation exactly. Click the images below to see a preview. If you would like to download this presentation, click here.

 

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Brave New World Anticipation Guide

 

This is a perfect way to introduce the novel to your students! There are 10 thematically- and conflict-related statements that will not only give students a glimpse into the strange world of the novel and also get them thinking about their own opinions on the topics. On this two-page worksheet, students will determine their opinion for each of the ten statements and then write 2-3 sentences to defend each of their opinions. When I use this anticipation guide in my classroom, I use it as a springboard to start a class-wide discussion. Click on the images below to see a preview.  To download this anticipation guide, click here.

Blank Vocabulary Worksheet

This form works with any unit and any vocabulary. You supply the words; your students use this form to define, identify the part of speech, and to write an original sentence using the word. This worksheet has room for 20 vocabulary words.

I have used this form in my classroom over the past 13 years, and it really does work with any unit. This form has been a true lifesaver for me when I have had to call in for a sub at the last minute! Keep copies on hand, just in case.

This is a two-page. PDF file. You can download this worksheet here.

Awesome Research and Works Cited Activity / Bingo Game

CCC Research Bingo

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This fun activity will introduce your students to the how-to’s of online research and creating a works cited page (also known as a bibliography). Students use a traditional-style Bingo form to research the answers to interesting trivia questions. They also document their sources. In the second activity, students use their newfound sources to create a sample works cited page.

I use this activity just prior to assigning the research essay.

Personality Research Webquest

CCC Personality Research Webquest

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This is a fun activity that I do with my 12th graders just before they embark on their major research paper. They love it because it is all about them, and I also get the added bonus of teaching them how to use the internet to conduct research, how to document their sources, and how to respond to informational text.

Students use computers or comparable technology to take a test and learn their Meyer-Briggs personality profile. From there, the complete research to see how this profile explains who they are and their plans for the future.

This activity could be used in an English or a psychology class. I use it with my 12th graders, but it could also be used in any high school classroom, college, or adult education situation.

This is a three-page PDF that contains detailed lesson plans, teacher tips, standards, objectives, and the two-page webquest form.

***COMPUTERS ARE REQUIRED***

An Introduction to Yearbooks

CCC Introduction to Yearbooks

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I advise a 400-page chronological yearbook, and we publish on a year-round basis. Training new staff members at the beginning of the year is important, and it must be done as quickly as possible. This is the first activity I have my new staff members do as an introduction to the parts of a yearbook and some of the terms that we used in publishing.

This worksheet is to be used in conjunction with sample yearbooks. I keep 20-30 different yearbooks in my classroom at any time as they serve as good inspirational and educational resources.

Each student takes a sheet and a yearbook. The form is rather self-explanatory and directs them to look for certain elements in the book. Upon completion, students are asked to rate the book and then present their findings in from of the class.

Most students are familiar with what a yearbook looks like and what he or she can expect to find inside on. This worksheet focuses on important terms and vocabulary that students will need to know for the rest of year.

Sell Your Lessons; Make a Plan!

 

When I first joined Teachers Pay Teachers, I got a little overwhelmed with the process of adding new products.

Hence the “TPT Planner” — The ultimate product planner that will help you put down all of the important details you need to complete your product description and your post-uploading action plan for promoting your product on social media platforms.

Form works for any and all grade levels / subjects / TPT product. It includes spaces that will assist you in completing the product addition process. Additionally, there is space on this form that will help you market your TPT product on social media platforms.

This is a PDF file. The downloadable form is free of CC logo and watermark.

Are you interested in selling your own lesson plans? Start here.

 

 

10 Review Activities with No Grading

10 Review Activities

Do you ever find yourself with too much grading and not enough time? Yes, it’s the song of our people. I cannot honestly remember the last weekend I did not have a least a few hours of paperwork to catch up on that I did not have time for during my regular work week.

Splat: Divide students into two or more teams and give each team an unused flyswatter. Hang relevant vocabulary word on the wall. Provide the students with a definition or a sentence — minus the word. The first team to swat the correct word with the flyswatter gets a point. This would also work well with literary terms, characters, quotes — the sky’s the limit! This activity requires 30 minutes of preparation

Jeopardy: This is my absolute favorite way to prepare my students for a test over a novel, play, or other major unit. Simply create your Jeopardy game to highlight the important information you want your students to know. Divide the class into two teams, have them pick a spokesperson (the only one who can give answer), and have fun! I do recommend picking a squirrelly student to assist you with keeping score. Additionally, I take away points when a team is talking out of turn. You can find a template to create your own Jeopardy! review game here. This activity requires 1-2 hours of preparation, but you can reuse it over and over.

Timeline Puzzle: This is a quick review activity that requires 5-10 minutes of preparation. Take a short story, play, or novel and chose 10-15 important events. You can either write them on the board — out of order, or type them up and cut them apart. Have students, in groups, arrange the events in the correct order. When one group is done, send members out to help other groups.

Students create their own test: This is another one of my favorite collaborative pre-test activities. In groups, students create the test they think they may see in the next day or two. I have them write a mix of questions: multiple choice, true/false, short answer, and essay. Not only are they responsible for coming up with meaningful questions (no gotcha! questions, they are also responsible for writing the answer key to their test. Once complete, I team up groups to challenge their classmates. Preparation time: none! Give credit for participation.

Students Teach their Peers: Here’s another minimal-prep activity. Assign collaborative groups to a particular section of a novel or play. I use this all the time when I teach Shakespeare and The Canterbury Tales. Tell students they are responsible for teaching the rest of the class their assigned portion of the novel, play, or ____. (Add your own ideas here.) I grade them as they present their information. Additionally, all students are required to take notes during presentations.

Four Corners: This activity is good discussion theme, persuasion, and some controversial topics related to literature. The instructions can be found here, although you can adapt them to fit your needs. I love doing this activities with my older students, as the discussions we have are meaningful and increase their interest in the reading. Prep time: 20-30 minutes.

Who Am I? — This is a fun post-novel or play activity. Write the names of characters on tape or address labels. Put them on students’ backs so they cannot see their name, but other students can. Students may ask each other only yes or no questions until they figure out which character they are. This would also be fun with literary terms. Prep time: 15 minutes.

Snowball fight: This fun vocabulary game is a crowd-pleaser. This works with vocabulary, literary terms, or even as a review before a test. Prep time: 10 minutes.

A Totally Not Boring Persuasive Writing Unit

CCC Alien Report PINTEREST

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When I first started teaching persuasive writing, I got really bored of the typical persuasive writing topics. The kids hated them; I got bored grading essays. Enter the alien report. This is absolutely my all-time favorite writing unit that I teach with my students. It gets them out of their writing “shell,” cleverly introduces the persuasive writing genre, and, most importantly, lets me find the joy of grading essays again.

This is a complete unit, divided into nine steps:

  1. Brainstorming topic

  2. Subtopic prewriting

  3. Thesis writing

  4. Complete outline

  5. Rough Draft

  6. Peer Editing

  7. Self checklist

  8. Final draft

  9. Grading rubric

This unit is perfect for grades 7-10, and it calls on prior knowledge of the five-paragraph essay and possibly MLA formatting.

This is a print and teach unit — no need to to anything else!