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Brave New World Anticipation Guide

 

This is a perfect way to introduce the novel to your students! There are 10 thematically- and conflict-related statements that will not only give students a glimpse into the strange world of the novel and also get them thinking about their own opinions on the topics. On this two-page worksheet, students will determine their opinion for each of the ten statements and then write 2-3 sentences to defend each of their opinions. When I use this anticipation guide in my classroom, I use it as a springboard to start a class-wide discussion. Click on the images below to see a preview.  To download this anticipation guide, click here.

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Blank Vocabulary Worksheet

This form works with any unit and any vocabulary. You supply the words; your students use this form to define, identify the part of speech, and to write an original sentence using the word. This worksheet has room for 20 vocabulary words.

I have used this form in my classroom over the past 13 years, and it really does work with any unit. This form has been a true lifesaver for me when I have had to call in for a sub at the last minute! Keep copies on hand, just in case.

This is a two-page. PDF file. You can download this worksheet here.

Personality Research Webquest

CCC Personality Research Webquest

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This is a fun activity that I do with my 12th graders just before they embark on their major research paper. They love it because it is all about them, and I also get the added bonus of teaching them how to use the internet to conduct research, how to document their sources, and how to respond to informational text.

Students use computers or comparable technology to take a test and learn their Meyer-Briggs personality profile. From there, the complete research to see how this profile explains who they are and their plans for the future.

This activity could be used in an English or a psychology class. I use it with my 12th graders, but it could also be used in any high school classroom, college, or adult education situation.

This is a three-page PDF that contains detailed lesson plans, teacher tips, standards, objectives, and the two-page webquest form.

***COMPUTERS ARE REQUIRED***

It Happened to Me: True Tales of Teaching, part 2

True Tales of Teaching-What is the most unexpected thing that has ever happened to you while you were teaching? I bet it had nothing to do with your students. My most unexpected moment of teaching came in an otherwise ordinary afternoon, but I never would have suspected the danger that lurked just over my head.

At the time, I taught freshmen and sophomore students at a beautiful high school in the middle of an otherwise deserted area. We have seen all manner of wildlife, from rabbits to hawks to barn owls, find their way onto our campus. Needless to say, the students are not the only creatures who have made their way inside the walls of my classroom.

It was a lovely spring afternoon, and I had just settled in with my sixth period freshman English class to read Act Three of “Romeo and Juliet.” Rome had just slain his new wife’s cousin, and things for the Montagues and the Capulets were going downhill fast. My students were on the edge of their seats, DYING to find out what happened next.

There was a sudden movement in the room. If you have ever taught a class of freshmen, you know that they can be squirrelly, but even this was out of the norm for my students. A subtle rustle began, a murmur like a gentle hum, and then a general movement. Something was amiss. The students knew what it was, but I was  clueless.

Frustrated by this interruption of the great Shakespeare, I demanded to know what was going on. “Ms. Flint!” The kids said excitedly, “There’s a bat on the floor.” They pointed to a small brownish object lying on the floor next to my storage cabinet.

I looked, and then I looked closer. “What is it?” I asked the kids. We gathered around it, giving it a respectable berth. “It’s a bat,” they chimed.

I looked it over again. It was small and looked unreal. For a moment, I wanted to believe one of my students had brought in a fake bat. “Did someone put this here?” I asked. “No,” said one brave soul,” It came though the ceiling.”

I looked up. I was in a second floor classroom, and it was true that I had heard scampering in the ceiling when the students were gone for the day, and I walked through the empty hallways. I had assumed it was birds, or even a squirrel. The thought of a bat had never entered my mind; but there it was, lying prone on the floor of my classroom.

There are things they teach you about in college: methodology, techniques, how to write a lesson plan, aligning your teaching with standards. But never had I been taught how to handle this.

“Is it dead?” a quivering voice asked. We stood staring, nobody answering, and nobody wanted to see for sure if the creature was actually alive. It was about that time that I remembered I was the only adult in the room. It was up to me to take decisive action, although I just really wanted to flee from my room.

A ruler, a puppy-emblazoned student folder, and a panicked phone call to the school custodian later, and the bat — which was not dead after all, only stunned — and the disruption was over. The bat was gone, the students returned to their desks, and the rest of the period was free for Romeo and Juliet. But really, after a bat falls through your ceiling, can Shakespeare really compete with that?

 

 

 

A Totally Not Boring Persuasive Writing Unit

CCC Alien Report PINTEREST

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When I first started teaching persuasive writing, I got really bored of the typical persuasive writing topics. The kids hated them; I got bored grading essays. Enter the alien report. This is absolutely my all-time favorite writing unit that I teach with my students. It gets them out of their writing “shell,” cleverly introduces the persuasive writing genre, and, most importantly, lets me find the joy of grading essays again.

This is a complete unit, divided into nine steps:

  1. Brainstorming topic

  2. Subtopic prewriting

  3. Thesis writing

  4. Complete outline

  5. Rough Draft

  6. Peer Editing

  7. Self checklist

  8. Final draft

  9. Grading rubric

This unit is perfect for grades 7-10, and it calls on prior knowledge of the five-paragraph essay and possibly MLA formatting.

This is a print and teach unit — no need to to anything else!

11 Ways to Beat Teacher Burnout

11 ways to beat teacher burnoutIt was just a few years ago that I was 100 percent certain that I didn’t want to teach any more. Teaching had taken over my life; I had no time for my family, and most importantly, I had no time for my own basic needs. I was tired and grumpy all of the time, and I found no joy in teaching any more.

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