lesson plan

Brave New World Anticipation Guide

 

This is a perfect way to introduce the novel to your students! There are 10 thematically- and conflict-related statements that will not only give students a glimpse into the strange world of the novel and also get them thinking about their own opinions on the topics. On this two-page worksheet, students will determine their opinion for each of the ten statements and then write 2-3 sentences to defend each of their opinions. When I use this anticipation guide in my classroom, I use it as a springboard to start a class-wide discussion. Click on the images below to see a preview.  To download this anticipation guide, click here.

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Awesome Research and Works Cited Activity / Bingo Game

CCC Research Bingo

Click here to download 

This fun activity will introduce your students to the how-to’s of online research and creating a works cited page (also known as a bibliography). Students use a traditional-style Bingo form to research the answers to interesting trivia questions. They also document their sources. In the second activity, students use their newfound sources to create a sample works cited page.

I use this activity just prior to assigning the research essay.

Why Failure is Sometimes an Option

Why Failure IS an Option

I’m at the end of my third quarter, and I’m dealing with those last-minute panicked pleas about grades and make-up work and college and parents. In fact, some of those pleas come from parents themselves. This is the week when I turn from my usually laid-back, happy self into the hard-nosed, crusty, experienced teacher that I can be.

You see, I value education. I value learning, and working hard, and defining success by the effort a child puts into the process of education. Grades are less relevant that the lessons learned and the skills a student achieves in the process. Grades may be important to getting into that college of choice, but they are less important in what really matters: succeeding in life.

I value education. I value learning, and working hard, and defining success by the effort a child puts into the process of education.

Look, I’m a mom; I get it. Nobody wants to see her child fail. We worry that it will affect his future, his fragile psyche, or his ability to succeed in the future. And there are plenty of special circumstances where we need to step in to protect our children: our child is diagnosed with a learning disability, our child is seriously physically or mentally ill, there are extenuating circumstances in the family or at school affecting our child’s ability to perform well in class. These are all valid reasons to step in and advocate for your child. Additionally, if you feel that your child is being unfairly treated by a teacher or staff member at a school, then you should most certainly intervene.

However, most of the contact I have with students and parents that I have about grades involve none of these circumstances. 99% of the contact I have this final week before grades post has to do with missing work and an unwillingness to accept responsibility for one’s own actions.

Here’s the situation: Student #1 has completed all of his work during the course of the quarter. He has studied for every test and quiz, come in for extra help on writing assignments, made sure he has asked questions when he does not understand concepts or instructions.

Student #2, on the other hand, is missing a large portion of her homework and in-class assignments. She rarely reads her directions thoroughly, completes haphazard work, and, more often than not, is checked out in class. You do your best to make sure she is focused in class, to alert her and her parents to her not-so-stellar grade on many occasions, and to tell her what she can do to bring up her grade.

failure2

She may be your precious baby, but you are doing your teen injustice by saving her from her own natural consequences.

Can you then understand my dismay when student #2 or her parent contacts me during the last week of the quarter wondering what she can do bring her F up to an A? Often, terms such as “athlete,” “college,” or “extra credit” are dropped. Here’s the deal, and this is what truly frustrates me: I do not understand why this grade is suddenly important when it hasn’t been for the past eight weeks. Additionally, fluffing a grade  or offering last-minute extra credit cheapens both my professionalism as a teacher and the experience of student #1, who honestly earned the A. It’s not going to happen.

Why this grade is suddenly important when it hasn’t been for the past eight weeks?

What is more valuable than a cheap A, or B, or C, in this case, is the lesson learned from the natural consequences of the situation. So student #2 fails, or manages, at the last minute, to pull her grade up to a credit-saving D. It’s not stellar, and it’s not going to get her into an Ivy league school that her parents have been dreaming about. What it might do is to teach her the value of hard work, and that our actions have consequences. It might create motivation within her to change. I have seen in it happen in many a student over the years.

What’s a parent to do? Be in contact with your student’s teacher early in the year. Come to open house night and conferences. Intercede early when you see that your child may be struggling. Ask questions. See if the teacher can give you clues to what is happening in class. Perhaps there is a comprehension issue or it ma simply be a refusal to complete work. Stay abreast of the grade situation; most schools have an online grading system that is updated weekly, or more often. Do not make demands of teachers that would put their professionalism into question. Last, but certainly not least, encourage your child to advocate for himself. This is especially true of high school students.

Encourage your child to advocate for himself.

Failure is a word that we like to pretend is not a part of success. But students, you are doing yourselves no favor by trying to avoid the consequences of your own actions. Parents, you do your children a disservice when you step in to protect them from the consequences of their own actions. Character is not as easy to come by, but it will take your children farther in life than an easy A.

35 Ways to Start a Conversation with Your Teen

35 Questions for Teenagers

  1. What was the best part of your day today?
  2. If you had $100, what would you do with it?
  3. If you could move to another state, where would you go and why?
  4. What’s the last thing that made you really laugh?
  5. Who do you respect the most and why?
  6. If you could have one superpower, what would you choose and why?
  7. Where would you like to travel?
  8. If you could change one thing about the world, what would it be and why?
  9. Who would you / will you  vote for and why?
  10. What’s your favorite class?
  11. If you were a shoe, what kind of shoe would you be?
  12. Describe your perfect day.
  13. What makes you feel good about yourself?
  14. Teach me a slang word you like to use.
  15. What is your biggest pet peeve?
  16. What color is your mind?
  17. If you could be an animal, which one would you choose and why?
  18. If you could have 50 of one item, what would it be?
  19. Which song is your jam?
  20. What was your favorite childhood toy?
  21. What do you think you will be doing ten years from now?
  22. If you could choose any other time period to live, when would you choose and why?
  23. If you could spend a day with anyone from history, who would you choose and why?
  24. Which of the four seasons is your favorite and why?
  25. If you were the ruler of the world, what things would you banish?
  26. If you could do something you have never done before, what would you do?
  27. What is the best thing you have ever done?
  28. If you could change one thing about school, what would it be?
  29. What is the best thing about being a boy / girl?
  30. What is the worst thing about being a boy / girl?
  31. If you had three wishes, what would they be?
  32. What is the most difficult things about being your age?
  33. How could school better prepare you to be an adult?
  34. If you had one week to live, what would you  do?
  35. What is the best present someone could give you?

An Introduction to Yearbooks

CCC Introduction to Yearbooks

Click here to download now!

I advise a 400-page chronological yearbook, and we publish on a year-round basis. Training new staff members at the beginning of the year is important, and it must be done as quickly as possible. This is the first activity I have my new staff members do as an introduction to the parts of a yearbook and some of the terms that we used in publishing.

This worksheet is to be used in conjunction with sample yearbooks. I keep 20-30 different yearbooks in my classroom at any time as they serve as good inspirational and educational resources.

Each student takes a sheet and a yearbook. The form is rather self-explanatory and directs them to look for certain elements in the book. Upon completion, students are asked to rate the book and then present their findings in from of the class.

Most students are familiar with what a yearbook looks like and what he or she can expect to find inside on. This worksheet focuses on important terms and vocabulary that students will need to know for the rest of year.

20 Problems Only Teachers Will Understand

20 Problems SquaredThey day you are running late and need to make copies, the copiers will be jammed — all of them.

When you are halfway through a long teaching unit, you will get three new students.

Your administrator walks into your classroom during the last hour of the day, on a Friday, after a pep rally, when you are sick.

The parents you really want to talk to do not show up to parent-teacher night.

The one kid who always pushes your buttons is never absent.

Students enjoy the lesson plans you think up in your car on the drive to school more than the ones you spent hours writing.

You spill coffee on your shirt the day you wear that cute new outfit you have been saving up  for.

The school WiFi will go out the day you plan for that awesome technological lesson plan.

You have permanent bruises on your legs that are exactly student desk height.

When you are sick, you suck it up and go in anyway because it’s easier to go in and feel like you might die than to put lesson plans together for a sub.

They day you give a big test, there will be a fire alarm.

Parents blame you when a student is failing your class, even though the student has refused to do any work in your class.

You write the due date for a big assignment on the board, on the assignment sheet, and you   mention it every day in  class. Students continually ask you the due date.

You go two weeks without a meeting, and suddenly you have three, all on the same day. At the same time.

The one time you go out with your friends to have drinks, you run into all of your students.

You finally get a chance to have a sit-down lunch, and administration decides it the right moment to hold a fire drill.

On the morning after you stay up late to perfect your lesson plans, you will realize that you are out of coffee.

After years of perfecting your curriculum and honing your lessons, the standards change.

When you are trying desperately to quiet your class, one student will make a joke so good you have to fight not to laugh along with the kids.

You spend hours researching and writing a presentation, and then that one kid asks you a question you don’t know the answer to.

It’s finally the weekend, and you cannot sleep past 5:30 a.m.

It’s Friday night, and your family thinks you suck for wanting to go right to bed.

That one kid that really pushes your buttons will give you the best, most thoughtful thank you note at the end of the year.

This post seems to have received a lot of interest lately. I’d love to get to know you a little better! Please leave a comment and let me know who you are. Thanks! ❤ Monica

10 Inspirational Quotes for Teachers

Need a little inspiration to get you through your week? Here you go:

What are your favorite inspirational quotes for teaching?

Do you Teach? Or Are You a Teacher?

When people ask you what you do, do you say “I teach,” or do you say “I am a teacher?” Because there is a significant distinction between teaching and being a teacher. Teaching is fleeting, lasts for the moment or the span of a lesson. Teaching involves assessing, methodology, adaptation, and a certain set of skills.

Being a teacher, on the other hand, is so much more than that.

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It Happened to Me: True Tales of Teaching, part 1

It Happened to Me- True Tales of Teaching, part oneThe year was 2002, and I was green. It was my first year as a real teacher, in my own classroom, and I was in charge of 90 hormonally-charged eighth grade students. Teaching grammar and reading and sentence fluency was often difficult when I had to combat students who couldn’t stop touching each other or putting on makeup in the middle of a lesson. I had three two-period block classes each day, and I often struggled to keep them entertained for 90 minutes at a stretch.

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